Browse Documents

94 documents found
  • Title
    Bird species richness in three different habitat types along Yongkala to Thrumshingla National Highway in Phrumsengla National park
    Type
    Report
    Description
    This report gives you an insight into the bird species found along the Yongkola to Thrumshingla pass. The survey was carried out with the manpower support from the staffs of Central Park Range, Lingmethang.
    Attribution
    Phrumsengla National Park, Bumthang Ura
  • Title
    A survey of Odonata from eastern Bhutan, with nine new national records
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Odonates were collected in five districts (Tashigang, Samdrupjongkhar, Lhuntse, Pemagatshel and Zhemgang) in the eastern half of Bhutan between 13-iv- and 30-v-2016 and in Lhuntse district and Kanglung region in June 2016. A total of 16 localities were visited and 42 species were found, nine of which are new to Bhutan. These are Philoganga montana, Anisogomphus occipitalis, Gomphidae sp., Davidius zallorensis, Stylogomphus inglisi, Chloro­ gomphus preciosus, Lyriothemis bivittata, Potamarcha congener and Zygonyx iris, increasing the number of Odonata species known from Bhutan to 104. Further key words. Dragonfly, damselfly, Anisoptera, Zygoptera
    Attribution
    Sherubtse College, National Biodiversity Centre & Bhutan Trust Fund for Environmental Conservation
  • Title
    Erhaia Davis & Kuo (Gastropoda, Rissooidea, Amnicolidae) also in Bhutan
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The occurrence of at least one species of Erhaia in Bhutan, viz. Erhaia wangchuki sp. n., is confirmed by DNA sequencing. A second unnamed species from Bhutan, that might be congeneric, is known from only a single shell. According to the molecular analysis, E. wangchuki is most closely related to a still undescribedErhaia species from China. These two species together with E. jianouensis and Akiyoshia kobayashii,both also from China, form a well supported clade. Awaiting additional molecular data, the apparent inconsistency regarding Erhaia versus Akiyoshia is not dealt with here. The extant true sister species of E. wangchuki could be among the four SE Himalayan species from Bhutan and Nepal that are classified with Erhaia on the basis of conchological data only.
    Attribution
    Naturalis Biodiversity Center, The Netherlands; Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environmental Research, Justus Liebig University, & National Biodiversity Centre
  • Title
    Rediscovery of Ludlow's Bhutan Glory, Bhutanitis ludlowi Gabriel (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): morphology and biology
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The papilionid butterfly,Bhutanitis ludlowi, Gabriel, was rediscovered after a lapse of 76 years since it was first collected in Trashiyangtse Valley of Trashi Yangtse, eastern Bhutan. The immature stages of this butterfly are recorded and illustrated for the first time. The morphology and biology of adult, egg and larval stages are compared with those of theBhutanitisspecies, in particularBhutanitis lidderdaliiAtkinson.Aritolochia griffithii(Aristolochiaceae) is recorded as the larval hostplant ofB. ludlowi.The habitat, conservation needs and biogeography of the butterfly are also briefly discussed.
    Attribution
    The University of Tokyo; Ministry of Agriculture and Forests, Bhutan; The Research Institute of Evolutionary Biology; Shinohara-kita & NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)
  • Title
    Primates of Bhutan and Observations of Hybrid Langurs
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Six, possibly seven, species of non-human primates occur in Bhutan: slow loris (Nycticebus bengalensis), Assamese macaque (Macaca assamensis), Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), Hanuman langur (Semnopithecus entellus), golden langur (Trachypithecus geei), and capped langur (Trachypithecus pileatus). A variant of the Assamese macaque, named Macaca munzala, has also been recorded there. Natural hybrids between golden and capped langur occur in an area in south-central Bhutan. The Assamese macaque is the most abundant and widespread primate, while slow loris is the least abundant, with a small range in Bhutan. Primates are not hunted for food in Bhutan, there are large areas of contiguous habitats for primates, and there is, besides, a good network of protected areas in the country. Overall, it would appear that primates have a secure future in Bhutan. The main conservation issues come from development, such as the construction of road networks and hydroelectric projects, grazing by domestic stock in some areas at high elevations, and people living in protected areas.
    Attribution
    The Rhino Foundation for Nature in Northeast India, Bamunimaidam, Guwahati, India
  • Title
    A preliminary report on the reptile fauna of the Kingdom of Bhutan with the description of a new species of scinid lizard (Reptilia: Scinidae)
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    The herpetofauna of the Kingdom of Bhutan has been poorly studied and few collections of Bhutanese reptiles have been made. Reptiles collected by the 1972 expedition of the Naturhistorisches Museum Basel (Switzerland) are presented as a basis for a preliminary species list for this eastern Himalayan country. Specimens representing seven families and 18 species were examined. Included is a new species of scincid lizard of the genus Mabuya. An additional five species have been reported from Bhutan and numerous other taxa are known from adjacent regions of Sikkim and Assam. Most of the fauna is pan-oriental in derivation and is widespread to the east, west and south. A number of species, however, are primarily Indo-Chinese in their affinities and extend only as far west as eastern Nepal. Collections from eastern Bhutan and from elevations over 1500 m are particularly small and additional field work will be required to provide a complete picture of the reptiles of the country.
    Attribution
    Villanova University, Pennsylvania, USA, and Museum fur Naturkunde der Humbodt za Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Title
    The status of herpetofauna of Bhutan
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    This paper presents the state-of-the-knowledge on herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians) of Bhutan. Through a comprehensive review of literature, the paper identifies 84 snakes, 23 lizards, 20 tortoises and turtles, 56 anurans, one caeilian and a Himalayan Salamander know to occur in Bhutan.
    Attribution
    District Forest Office, Trashigang, Bhutan
  • Title
    Hepaticae from Bhutan, East Himalaya
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    An outline of previous collections from Bhutan is given; 55 species collected by the author in Bhutan in 1975 are enumerated; they include 39 species new to Bhutan of which 6 are new to the eastern Himalayas. Notes on the more interesting of these are appended.
    Attribution
    Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburg, UK
  • Title
    Additions to the herpetofauna of Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan, with six new country records
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    We present the results of a rapid herpetofaunal inventory conducted in Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan, in June 2014. Visual encounter surveys, opportunistic searches, and pitfall traps were used during four days of fieldwork to document diversity. Twelve species of amphibians and 20 species of reptiles were recorded during the survey. Six species (Uperodon globulosus, Ingerana borealis, Calotes maria, Cnemaspis assamensis, Ptyctolaemus gularis, Trimeresurus properirum) are new additions to the herpetofauna of Bhutan.
    Attribution
    WII, India; Samanwoy Path, India; Arya Vidyapeeth College, India; Gauhati University, India; & Royal Manas National Park, Bhutan
  • Title
    Mosses of Bhutan 11: A checklist of the mosses of Bhutan
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    A checklist is given of the mosses of Bhutan based on published reports. Totals of 156 genera and 282, species are recorded. The main past collectors of mosses in Bhutan are listed, together with sources of erroneous reports; 44 erroneous and doubtful taxa are excluded. The name Breutelia setschwanica is applied to the only Himalayan member of the genus. The name Barbula [lavicans is proposed as an avowed substitute for the illegitimate Tortula flavescens Hook. & Grev. (Barbula fuscescens C. Mull. nom. inval.)
    Attribution
    Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburg, UK
  • Title
    New records of dragonflies (Odonata) from Toebirongchhu sub-watershed in Punakha District, Western Bhutan
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    Opportunistic survey of dragonfly diversity and distribution was done in Toebirongchhu sub-watershed within Punakha Dzongkhag, Western Bhutan to give updated list of species within the study area and the Dzongkhag, and update the species list for Bhutan. Total of 24 species belonging to 19 genera and 11 families were recorded of which 22 species are new record for the study area, 20 species for the Punakha Dzongkhag and 1 for Bhutan. The updated list of species for Punakha Dzongkhag is 28 species and for Bhutan is 85 species. Important records are Anisogomphus caudalis a Data Deficient species and a new record for Bhutan, Aristocypha (Rhinocypha) cuneata, another Data Deficient species, Epiophlebia laidlawi a Near Threatened species and Anisopleura bella a recently described species currently recorded only from Bhutan.
    Attribution
    College of Natural Resources, Lobesa, Punakha, Bhutan
  • Title
    Odonata survey in Central and Western Bhutan covering eight Dzongkhags (Districts): An annotated species list with nine new records
    Type
    Journal Article
    Description
    122 specimens have been collected spreading to 46 species under 32 genera and 11 families from different parts of central and western Bhutan during August 13 to 23, 2013. Nine species and subspecies of them are the new records for Bhutan. Geographical position and collection details are provided for each species which are supplemented by abdominal length, hind wing length and some other identifying characters for the new records. After the present study a total of 84 species and subspecies of odonata are known to occur in Bhutan.
    Attribution
    Sherubtse College, and Paro College of Education